Storm Odette Enters Philippines, Tipped for Landfall at Start of Simbang Gabi

Landfall is likely 9 days before Christmas.
Photo/s: Facebook/PAGASA

Tropical storm Odette entered the Philippine Area of Responsibility on Thursday, with the potential to bring "destructive" winds when it makes landfall in the southeast on Dec. 16, the first day of Simbang Gabi for Catholics.

Odette will likely gather strength at sea and reach peak Signal no. 3 winds (121 to 170 kph) before it hits land late Thursday, PAGASA said. It will bring heavy rains to parts of Mindanao, nearly the entire Visayas and Southern Luzon through Friday before exiting the country at the end of the week.

The storm crossed into PAR at 7 p.m., packing maximum sustained winds of 95 kph with 115 kph gusts.

"Ang paalala natin ay maging maingat at alerto at maging handa po tayo dahil magiging mapaminsala ang dala nitong hangin at pag-ulan diyan po sa area na 'yan," said PAGASA forecaster Grace Castaneda.

WEATHER EXPLAINED:

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What to expect, how to prepare

SIGNAL NO. 1

WINDS: 30-60 kph may be expected in at least 36 hr
SEA CONDITIONS (Open Sea)
Wave Height: 1.25-4.0 meters

DAMAGE TO STRUCTURE:

  • Very light or no damage to high risk structures,
  • Light to medium and low risk structures
  • Slight damage to some houses of very light materials or makeshift structures in exposed communities.

DAMAGE TO VEGETATION:

  • Some banana plants are tilted, a few downed and leaves are generally damaged
  • Twigs of small trees may be broken.
  • Rice crops, however, may suffer significant damage when it is in its flowering stage.

SIGNAL NO. 2

WINDS: 61-120 kph may be expected in at least 24 hr
SEA CONDITIONS (Open Sea)
Wave Height:4.1-14.0 m
Storm surge possible at coastal areas.

DAMAGE TO STRUCTURE:

  • Light to Moderate damage to high risk structures;
  • Very light to light damage to medium-risk structures;
  • No damage to very light damage to low risk structures
  • Unshielded, old dilapidated schoolhouses, makeshift shanties, and other structures of light materials are partially damaged or unroofed.
  • Some old galvanized iron (G.I.) roofs may be peeled or blown off.
  • Some wooden, old electric posts are tilted or downed.
  • Some damage to poorly constructed signs/billboards.
  • SIGNAL NO. 3

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    WINDS: 121-170 kph may be expected in at least 18 hr
    SEA CONDITIONS (Open Sea)
    Wave Height: > 14.0 meters
    Storm surge possible in coastal areas.

    DAMAGE TO STRUCTURE:

    • Heavy damage to high–risk structures;Moderate damage to medium-risk structures;
    • Light damage to low-risk structures
    • Increasing damage to old, dilapidated residential structures and houses of light materials (up to 50% in a community)
    • Houses of medium strength materials (old, timber or mixed timber-CHB structures, usually with G.I. roofings), some warehouses or bodega-type structures are unroofed

    DAMAGE TO VEGETATION:

    • Almost all banana plants are downed, some big trees (acacia, mango, etc.) are broken or uprooted,
    • Dwarf-type or hybrid coconut trees are tilted or downed
    • Considerable damage to shrubbery and trees with heavy foliage blown off; some large trees blown down.

    What to do during Public Storm Signal No. 1:

    1. Listen to your radio for more information about weather disturbance.
    2. Check the ability of the house to withstand strong winds and strengthen it if necessary.
    3. Monitor the latest severe weather Bulletin issued by PAGASA every six hours. Business may be carried out as usual except when flooding occurs.

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